Posts tagged ‘abcs’

Final Installment of the ABC’s of Crohn’s & UC: “T,” “U,” “V,” “X,” & “Z”

It’s hard to believe that we’ve come to the end of the alphabet and thus the end of my ABC’s of Crohn’s & UC series. After this post, I will compiled all of the previous ones into a page on the blog so you can easily access this glossary I’ve compiled about IBD. Additionally, if I’ve missed anything important for any letter, please let me know!!! I would love to keep adding to this list and eventually turn it into something to help explain these diseases to those who are unfamiliar.

That being said, here is the final installment: T, U, V, X & Z.

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January 16, 2013 at 9:09 pm 2 comments

The ABC’s of Crohn’s & UC: “R” & “S”

I can’t believe we are almost at the end of the alphabet! There will be one or two more posts after this one and then my glossary of Crohn’s & Ulcerative Colitis will be completed. But before we get to that point, we have a few more letters to get through.

Tonight, we tackle R & S.

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January 9, 2013 at 7:44 pm 1 comment

The ABC’s of Crohn’s & UC: “O” & “P”

We are over halfway done with the ABC’s of Crohn’s and Colitis series! I hope it’s been informative thus far for those who have been following along.

Next up in the ABC’s of Crohn’s and Colitis series: O and P.

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January 3, 2013 at 9:27 pm 2 comments

Caring for Crohn’s & UC: Year in Review

This has been a great year for Caring for Crohn’s, both on the blog and personally.

After toying with the idea for several months, I finally launched the blog in June. After a few months on Tumblr, the blog was merged onto WordPress and now here we are!

In just six months, I wrote 73 posts and the blog received over 3,600 views, and gained 19 WordPress followers, 50 Tumblr followers, 124 Facebook fans, and 175 Twitter followers. Thank you all SO much for your readership and support– this blog branched out beyond my wildest dreams and I am so appreciative of all of you who made that happen.

Photo on 12-31-12 at 3.45 PM #2

Without further ado, here are some of the 2012 highlights for Caring for Crohn’s!

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December 31, 2012 at 3:49 pm Leave a comment

The ABC’s of Crohn’s & UC: “M” & “N”

I may be posting intermittently from now until the end of the year with the influx of relatives that will be visiting and staying with us. However, I wanted to get one more ABC post in while I still had the time. So without further ado, next up in the ABC’s of Crohn’s and UC- “M” and “N.”

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December 21, 2012 at 6:02 pm 2 comments

The ABC’s of Crohn’s & UC: “L”

My heart is still heavy from the Newtown shooting in my home state but I wanted to go back to the real reason why I blog: to educate people and raise awareness about Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis.

Tonight’s post is the next installment in the ABC’s of Crohn’s and UC series- the letter L.

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December 16, 2012 at 8:36 pm 1 comment

The ABC’s of Crohn’s & UC: “J” & “K”

It’s been a few weeks since I did an installation in my ABC’s of Crohn’s & UC series. With other topics arising and Crohn’s & Colitis Awareness Week occurring, it’s fallen off my radar. So here is the next installation, and it will be a short one: J and K.

Jejunoileitis: One of the types of Crohn’s Disease. Jejunoileitis affects the jejunum (see below). Symptoms include cramps after meals, fistulas, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Kind of sounds like all the other types of Crohn’s.

Jejunum: The upper half of the small intestines.

J-Pouch: One name for an ileo-anal pouch. The J-Pouch is an internal reservoir where the rectum would be. A J-Pouch is traditionally done through a multi-part surgery. The first surgery involves the removal of the large intestines and rectum and the fashioning of the pouch. At the end of the first surgery, the patient is given a temporary ileostomy in order to give the pouch time to heal. After a period of time (typically 6-12 weeks), a second surgery is performed known as the “take down” in which the ileostomy is reversed.

 

Kidney Stones: One of the most common kidney complications in Crohn’s patients. According to CCFA, kidney stones are common in patients who has Crohn’s in the small intestines because of fat malabsorption. You are at a higher risk for kidney stones if you’ve had a number of bowel resections because you are more prone to dehydration. Symptoms of kidney stones include sharp pain (particularly in your lower back), nausea, vomiting, and blood in the urine. Treatment calls for an increased fluid intake and a diet that is rich in juices and vegetables. If you are unable to pass the kidney stones on your own, you may have to have them removed which is through a simple procedure.

Kock Pouch: A Kock Pouch is an internal pouch formed by the terminal ileum after a colectomy. The pouch has a large volume so that feces can be stored temporarily without the need for a stoma bag. A Kock Pouch may be created if the patient cannot have an ileo-anal pouch or who develop incontinence after an ileo-anal pouch.

December 9, 2012 at 5:04 pm 3 comments

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